Sustainable Aviation Symposium 2016: Would You Believe Eric Darcy Deliberately Blows Up Batteries?

Dean Sigler Batteries, Sustainable Aviation 0 Comments

Eric Darcy is NASA’s go-to guy for battery safety.  He is Battery Group Lead for Projects & Integration at NASA-Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and consults frequently with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado. His talk at the First Sustainable Aviation Symposium was titled, “Passively Thermal Runaway Propagation Resistant Battery Module That Achieves > 190 WH/KG.”  The output may not sound like much, being at the middle-to-high end of lithium battery performance: but the promise of passive thermal runaway resistance is all-important.  Remember, too, that larger output numbers are usually for individual cells.  Putting cells into a battery pack with battery management system (BMS) components, wiring, etc. usually reduces overall performance per weight. A few years ago, Dr. Darcy told …

Silent 2 Electro Certified in Germany

Dean Sigler Electric Powerplants, Sustainable Aviation 0 Comments

Luka Znidarsic shared this happy message this morning. “We are very proud to inform you, that the SILENT 2 Electro, equipped with our FES system, has been awarded Type Certification by the German Aero Club (DAeC). “This is the very first electric powered Ultralight sailplane certified, by DAeC. This represents a significant milestone in gliding history, which marks a new age of technology!” We hope this breakthrough in Germany encourages our own Federal Aviation Administration to review their schedule for electric aircraft certification.  Such rule making would allow sales of existing electric motorgliders and   light aircraft and encourage others to step up development of these alternatives to fuel-burning lightplanes. The Type Certificate gives some clear ideas of the technology incorporated in the very …

A Smart Battery Management System and Multiple Sensors

Dean Sigler Electric Powerplants, Sustainable Aviation 0 Comments

Fraunhofer and the Hochschule Esslingen University of Applied Sciences have created an electronic race car that they will show at the Sensor + Test Measurement Fair in Nuremberg, Germany from May 14 through 16.  Not only electrically driven, the innovative vehicle holds a number of sensor and control systems that might be of interest to electric aircraft designers. EVE, the product of the school and Fraunhofer’s labors, can sprint from 0 to 100 kilometers an hour (62 mph) in 3.6 seconds with its twin 60 kilowatt, 4,500 rpm motors, and reach a top speed of 140 km/hr (86.8 mph).  Its 8 kilowatt-hour lithium polymer batteries allow only a short run of 22 kilometers (13.64 miles) though, not surprising in terms of …