Contrails and Climate Change

Dean Sigler Diesel Powerplants, Sustainable Aviation Leave a Comment

Contrails are the trails of condensed water vapor that follow an airplane at a high enough and cold enough altitude.  They became a visible presence in World War II and were part of newsreels of allied bombers hitting Germany and dog fights over the English countryside.  There was more than just an aesthetic side to the new, high clouds in the sky, though. Post-9/11 During the attacks on September 11, 2001, FAA controllers, “Did the only thing they could think of to try to control the situation: ordering every aircraft in U.S. airspace, about 4,000 of them, to land somewhere, anywhere, immediately.” “Canadian officials followed. Airports in Atlantic Canada quickly filled with thousands of bewildered people who had been flying west across the …

EAS VIII: Klaus Ohlmann Conquers Everest

Dean Sigler Electric Powerplants, GFC, Sustainable Aviation Leave a Comment

Klaus Ohlmann says the sailplanes and solar-powered aircraft in which he has set several world records are powered by a “gravitational engine with an external fusion reactor.”  He has been on a sun-stoked roll the last few years.   His recounting of the epic journey first to fly a Stemme motorglider from Germany to Katmandu, and then to conquer Mount Everest in a sailplane, kept the eighth annual Electric Aircraft Symposium audience enthralled.  That feat alone would be enough for admiration, but his seemingly never-ending series of adventures provoke a bit of awe. He is a member of the Mountain Wave Project (MWP), a group which explores high-altitude weather systems to verify theoretical considerations.   As stated in the MWP’s web site, …

EADS, Partners Open Electric Airplane Campus

Dean Sigler Diesel Powerplants, Electric Powerplants, Sustainable Aviation Leave a Comment

The European Aeronautic Defense and Space Co. (EADS), IABG – a company providing analysis and testing for aerospace companies, and Siemens AG are collaborating along with educational partners the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Bundeswehr University Munich, the Munich University of Applied Sciences, Bauhaus Luftfahrt, and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) to form the Ludwig Boelkow Campus consortium. Consortium partners have also signed a declaration of intent governing future cooperation between the newly founded Ludwig Boelkow Campus GmbH and the Munich Aerospace e.V., aerospace faculty. Named after an aerodynamicist who worked under Antony Fokker, and who headed development of the Messerschmidt ME-262 jet fighter in WWII, the campus will integrate multiple academic  disciplines and industries in work designed to …